Hobbit Hole: Burying a wood Structure

Hobbit Hole: Burying a wood Structure


I researched a lot of different ways & materials to build the hobbit house.  I ended up going with the least expensive & least cumbersome option which was to do a typical stick build while transforming it into anything but typical. This is how I did it.


Once we carved into the mountainside we laid a layer of gravel & plastic on top of that to build our foundation on. Using 2×6 treated lumber on 12″ centers instead of 2×4’s on 16″ centers, we built our 24′ x 12′ structure which then was sheeted in 3/4″ marine plywood. That made for a crazy sturdy box! We wanted to make sure it would be able to support the amount of dirt that would eventually be covered in.


The next major concern was water & how to keep it out! Once the hobbit hole was buried it would be pretty close to impossible to fix a leak.  I found the solution in Certainteed. We used Certainteed house wrap & ice guard around the entire house. Taping any seams & using there flashing on all the corners. I haven’t seen any flashing like this before it was sticky & stretchy peel stick saved tons of time.

We added a corrugated metal roof just to prevent any rocks in the soil from pin-pricking through just to be safe. We also came up with the idea of using straw bales as yet another barrier between the house and the soil. That accomplished a couple things, one it helped block any big rocks from slamming into the house as well as cut down on the amount of fill it was going to take. The last step was adding french drains all the way around the house & then it was ready to bury!!

 

 

12 Responses to Hobbit Hole: Burying a wood Structure

  1. bob dillard says:

    Thank you, Kristie. Wish I was watching the clouds drift by with you.

  2. Michael Lewis says:

    Can’t wait to see the final product. You are such a pioneer. Very impressed.

  3. Thanks for an update. I have been very curious about the project!

  4. davidd says:

    Thank you for posting these details! I’ve been extremely curious about how the Hobbit House was constructed. I’d really like to try something like this myself. Looking forward to more details! And… congratulations on your successful first guest reviews!

  5. william warner says:

    when burying anything be sure of the soil condition and type. clay will swell when wet and crush most things.

  6. Perfect. I was wondering how to keep the water out. Really appreciate the informative update!!

  7. Kat Mao says:

    Kristie, your hobbit house is amazing! I would love to look into building one in the Western Washington area. Did you build it entirely from scratch, and are the house plans/blueprints available for sale? I’d love to build a Shire Community over here, and am wondering how to get started.

  8. Norris Krueger says:

    As always, Kristie, I am impressed!!

  9. Nate says:

    Kristie, as others have said before this is an incredible hobbit hole that you’ve made. My wife and I plan to hopefully build a similar hobbit hole in southern CA, but we sure could use some help. Would you be interested in working as a consultant for our Hobbit Hole and if not could you recommend anyone? We have a myriad of questions ranging from permitting to utilities, and more as I’m sure you did, so any help would be most appreciate.

  10. Nik Summers says:

    Kristie,

    Hi!

    I am a Ph.D. student in sociology at Indiana University and I am studying tiny homes for my dissertation (people living in them, legalization efforts, etc.). I am writing to ask if you would be interested in taking my Qualtrics survey? It’s short (about 10 mins) and some people have told me it’s even fun to fill out!

    Link: https://iu.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_cBjkCE36OqRXVR3

    Contact me at nesummer@umail.iu.edu or at 812-219-5214 if you have any questions or just want to confirm that I’m a real person and that the link is not spam. Thanks!

    Nik Summers
    Sociology Department
    Indiana University

  11. Bryan Bresler says:

    Fascinating! My wife and I are buying a home near the Hobbit Inn, less than a mile as the crow flies. Someday I’d like to build a cabin into the side of the mountain just to moderate the temperature – or at least a deep basement. I know this area experiences both hot and cold temperature extremes. I can’t wait to see the Hobbit Inn this spring or summer.

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